High Street

Diane Lynch

The first images below show High Street from the Chapel Road end, with the almshouses and the Three Blackbirds in the foreground, along with the village pump. The almshouses were built in 1669 for Thomas Saunders; the Three Blackbirds dates in part from 16th century. A recent view from here is shown for comparison.

The views up High Street from Church Road take in houses, the Spotted Dog and the post office. Houses in High Street date from 16th century onwards, including those on the left which were once known as  Squeakers Garrets. The post office at the turn of 20th century was in a building that had once been the workhouse. Next to it was the Sebright Room, where various village meetings were held.  Today’s post office and shop are in what was the Sebright Room and can be seen in the colour image below.  There was also a butcher’s shop, across the space next to the Spotted Dog; this pub dates in part from 17th century.

View down High Street from the almshouses and the Three Blackbirds in the 1900s
E Mott (C Motley postcard collection)
High Street from its junction with Chapel Road, 2020
Andrew Lambourne
The village pump and almshouses at the end of High Street in the 1900s
C Motley postcard collection
High Street's junction with Chapel Road, showing bench and sign where once the water pump stood, 2020
Andrew Lambourne
Junction of High Street with Chapel Road, pump and signpost, 1920s
C Motley postcard collection
View up High Street towards Chapel Road, houses and Spotted Dog, 1920s
C Motley postcard collection
View up High Street towards Chapel Road, post office, houses and Spotted Dog, 1910s
Everett & Siggers (C Motley postcard collection)
View up High Street towards Chapel Road, post office, houses and Spotted Dog, 1920s
C Motley postcard collection
Post office/store in High Street 2020 and building next door that housed the post office until the 1960s
Andrew Lambourne
This page was added on 13/04/2021.

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